Ford Verve concepts

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Ford Verve
Ford Verve concept
Automotive industryFord Motor Company
AssemblyCamaçari, Bahia, Brazil(Sedan (car))
Car classificationConcept car
Car body style4-door Sedan (car)
3-door Hatchback
Automobile layoutFF layout
Internal combustion engine1.4L Straight-4
Wheelbase98.0 in (2489 mm)
Length145.4 in (3693 mm)
Width65.1 in (1654 mm)
Height54.3 in (1379 mm)

The Ford Verve concepts are a series of Subcompact car concepts from Ford of Europe. Together, they are expected to form the basis of the replacement for the current Ford Fiesta[1] and help Ford meet market demands for smaller, more fuel-efficient cars. [2] The production versions will be sold in North America, Europe, and Asia. [3] The first concept debuted at the 2007 Frankfurt Motor Show.

Verve comes in both four- and three-door body styles. The four-door is the basis for the production vehicle that will be sold in North America beginning in 2010. The European three-door is being shown to test market reaction to the body style – as a possible additional small car for the North American market.

Viewed from the front, the vehicle features:

Ford Verve SMPR[4]: A bold, three-bar graphic with a Ford blue oval in the upper grille opening and downsized the lower, inverted trapezoidal grille. Pronounced, rearward-stretching headlamps, giving the face of the Ford Verve concept a friendly, open and inviting personality. A toned and athletic hood sculpture that’s not overtly muscular. Prominent headlamps that feature two projector beams and a light-emitting diode (LED) array. Two unique LED side markers flank the front fascia. Specially designed 18-inch, 12-spoke two-piece alloy wheels that lend even more drama to the car.

From the side view,

The profile is emphasized by the pillar-less side window shape, mirroring the body’s curving upper contour line. This extends rearward from the angular A-pillar to marry the semi-high-mounted, LED tail lamps sculpted to become part of the fullness of the body shape.These elements blend cohesively together and support the panoramic glass roof. Subtle chrome bars accent the door handles. Brushed aluminum accents the lower grille surround, the rear number plate surround, and the lower edge of the front fog lamps. Low-profile tires feature a sidewall stripe that complements the rich Rouge Red body color.

source: Ford Verce Concept SMPR

Contents

First Verve Concept


The Verve continues Ford's Kinetic Design family styling theme, first seen on the Ford S-MAX.

Martin Smith, executive director of design for Ford of Europe, described the Verve as "a chic, modern and individualistic statement for a sophisticated, fashion-aware generation."[5] The concept was created by a team of designers from Ford studios in Dunton, England, and Cologne, Germany.

Occupants are cocooned in a cabin trimmed in different hues of glove leather, with an array of modern multimedia conveniences at their fingertips.

The slick three-door hatchback features a panoramic glass roof, pillarless side glass, LED headlamps, high-mounted LED taillamps, integrated tailgate spoiler and dark-chrome lower diffuser with integrated center exhaust outlet.

The car rides on 18-inch low-profile tyres mounted on two-piece, 12-spoke alloy wheels.

Second Verve Concept


On November 19, 2007, Ford unveiled its second Verve concept. This second version took the form of a four-door Notchback and was styled similarly to the Frankfurt version of the car. It was finished in frosted grape. [6]

Third Verve Concept


An further four-door Verve concept car for North America was revealed at the North American International Auto Show in January 2008.[7][8] It was finished in Rouge Red, and unique to this version, featured a modified front fascia. The most notable changes were in a deeper upper grille, with Ford of North America's trademark 'three-bar' graphic, and a downsized lower inverted trapezoidal grille.

It was confirmed in the press release that a model based on this concept will launch in North America in 2010.

References

External links

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