Getrag

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Getrag
TypeCorporation
FoundedLudwigsburg, Germany (1935)
HeadquartersUntergruppenbach, Germany
Key peopleDieter Schlenkermann, CEO/Director
Tobias Hagenmeyer, President
Hans-Jürgen Förster, CFO
IndustryAuto parts supplier
ProductsAutomobile transmissions
Automobile axles
Employees10,065 (as of June 30, 2006)
WebsiteGetrag.com

Getrag (sometimes written GETRAG) is a leading manufacturer of automobile manual transmissions. The company was founded on 1 May, 1935 in Ludwigsburg, Germany by Hermann Hagenmeyer as the Getriebe- und Zahnradfabrik Hermann Hagenmeyer AG ("Transmission and gear factory Hermann Hagenmeyer AG"). Today, the company is allied with the Dana Corporation, Volvo and the Ford Motor Company, but supplies transmissions to most auto manufacturers including General Motors, Daimler AG, Fiat, Porsche, BMW (Mini (BMW)), Toyota and the Volkswagen Group. Chief competitors include Aisin and ZF.

Getrag recently entered into two new alliances with Ford and Chrysler to produce the Dual Clutch Powershift Transmission at two new plants in North America: one in Kokomo, Indiana and the other in Mexico. Production will begin in 2008 for DCx (Tipton, IN), 2009 for Ford (Mexico) and then an additional DCx volume out of Mexico in 2010. The headquarters for the new division, Getrag Transmissions Corporation (GTC), is located in Sterling Heights, MI.

The Dual Clutch Transmission combines the advantages of a manual and an automatic transmission, and is more energy efficient than either. Shifting between gears will be unnoticeable to passengers. Two main versions will be produced: a "wet" clutch version which utilizes hydraulic fluid for shifting and a "dry" clutch version which uses electronic motors to control the clutch.

On November 17, 2008, GTC declared bankruptcy over debts incurred while manufacturing their Indiana plant. Getrag blamed Chrysler LLC for failing to follow through on promised funding for the new plant.

Products

Longitudinal engines

Transverse engines

Transaxles

External links